Justice, Theodicy

lament like hell for the living

O Lord, how long shall I cry for help,
and you will not listen?
Or cry to you “Violence!”
and you will not save?
Why do you make me see wrongdoing
and look at trouble?
Destruction and violence are before me;
strife and contention arise.
-Habakkuk 1:2-3

Maybe it’s the heat, or perhaps it’s because theodicy has been on my mind for the last 10 years, or mayhaps I just enjoy good music. Anyway, ‘Prayer In C’ by Lilly Wood & The Prick has been my song for the week.

Yah*, you never said a word
You didn’t send me no letter
Don’t think I could forgive you
 
See our world is slowly dying
I’m not wasting no more time
Don’t think I could believe you
 
Yah, our hands will get more wrinkled
And our hair will be grey
Don’t think I could forgive you
 
And see the children are starving
And their houses were destroyed
Don’t think they could forgive you
 
Hey, when seas will cover lands
And when men will be no more
Don’t think you can forgive you
 
Yeah when there’ll just be silence
And when life will be over
Don’t think you will forgive you

Its posture of prayer, questioning, and lament fills my heart with such joy. Partly because it’s good to know that there are songs like this out there, since this would never be sung in the context of a church service. It harkens back to the tradition of the prophets, like Habakkuk (quoted at the top) and the psalms, especially Psalm 6 with the psalmist pleading with God saying, “For in death there is no remembrance of you;  in Sheol who can give you praise?” (6:5). In other words, don’t let my enemies kill me, for who will praise you then. 

“Prayer in C” also has these great statements and questions about forgiveness:
1. God does not respond to my pleas and prayers. How can I forgive God?
2. Our bodies are deteriorating. How can I forgive God?
3. The world is falling apart: children dying, housing destroyed. How can those affected forgive God?
4. Once the Earth is destroyed and no living creatures are around, will God forgive Godself?

This lament is not as much as the singer becoming an atheist; rather, it’s her expressing frustration and wanting God to respond with cosmic justice, quickly.

It’s hard not to have this plea daily.

Tonight, I’ve been reading all that I can about Imam Maulama Akonjee and his assistant, Thara Uddin, who were murdered in Queens. My prayers go out to their families. This was an act of evil.

I am reminded of the eternal words of Mother Jones: 

pray for the dead.png

May I live with such zeal for life and that I surround myself with like-minded lovers of life. 

*Yah, of course, is a shortened name for YHWH (or God).

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Monday Quote, Pop Culture, Theodicy

mr. robot questions theodicy

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Mr. Robot‘s Elliot gave an epic rant before a faith-based support group in the latest episode, k3rnel-pan1c.ksd, saying,

“Tell me, why didn’t God help my innocent friend who died for no reason while the guilty ran free? Okay. Fine. Forget the one offs. How about the countless wars declared in his name? Okay. Fine. Let’s skip the random, meaningless murder for a second, shall we? How about the racist, sexist, phobia soup we’ve all been drowning in because of him? And I’m not just talking about Jesus. I’m talking about all organized religion. Exclusive groups created to manage control. A dealer getting people hooked on the drug of hope. His followers, nothing but addicts who want their hit of bullshit to keep their dopamine of ignorance. Addicts. Afraid to believe the truth. That there’s no order. There’s no power. That all religions are just metastasizing mind worms, meant to divide us so it’s easier to rule us by the charlatans that wanna run us. All we are to them are paying fanboys of their poorly-written sci-fi franchise. If I don’t listen to my imaginary friend, why the f*ck should I listen to yours? People think their worship’s some key to happiness. That’s just how he owns you. Even I’m not crazy enough to believe that distortion of reality. So f*ck God. He’s not a good enough scapegoat for me.”

I will be chewing on Elliot’s words this week. Hopefully I’ll have something constructive to say by Friday.

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Justice, Liberation Theology, Politics, Theodicy

a reflection on the boston tragedy

I mourn over the horrific violent act in Boston and all those effected. This was a senseless act of aggression and terror. As they still have not found anyone to blame this act on, let us pray for the perpetrators that they repent, and change their ways toward justice and compassion.

Concerning theodicy (a good God in an evil world), theologian Jurgen Moltmann responds in this way found in his book The Trinity and the Kingdom:

“God and suffering belong together, just as in this life the cry for God and the suffering experienced in pain belong together. The question about God and the question about suffering are a joint, a common question. And they only find a common answer. Either that, or neither of them finds a satisfactory answer at all. No one can answer the theodicy question in this world, and no one can get rid of it. Life in this world mean living with this open question, and seeking the future in which the desire for God will be fulfilled, suffering will be overcome, and what has been lost will be restored.” (49)

Let us keep our questions and hearts open to God as we process this tragedy.  Let us also remember those who suffer this kind of reality on a daily basis.

 

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