anti-war, Peace

ramblings about anti-war, the election, and calvin

I’ve been thinking about how difficult voting with a clean conscience appears to be with this election, and perhaps all elections. I consider myself a single issues voter; my issue is justice. More specifically, I care deeply and have been part of peace movements for almost a decade. Unfortunately, the nominees for President are rather slim pickings when it comes to justice and peace issues. Neither wants to shut down Guantanamo Bay* or side strongly with the Black Lives Matter movement or even consider to decrease/eliminate our military budget.

Since I’m a new Presbyterian I thought John Calvin, a founder of Presbyterianism, might give me some insight into our predicament, but unfortunately I was sidetracked by his affirmative writings on war:

In the Institutes of the Christian Religion, Calvin declared war to be lawful and right. He reasoned “that in the Apostolic writings we are not to look for a distinct exposition of those matters [i.e. war], their object being not to form a civil polity, but to establish the spiritual kingdom of Christ” (4.20.12). Calvin depoliticizes the Gospels and the letters of Paul, Peter, John, and James. He completely ignores the Imperialist context they were resisting. For example, Paul rebukes Peter of not practicing reconciliation around a meal with non-Jewish Christians (Galatians 2:11-14). James tongue-lashed the rich for condemning and killing the non-violent righteous one (5:6). Or even John’s First Letter, which declares that loving other people and loving God go hand-in-hand (1 John 4:20-21).

For Calvin the Scriptures show “in passing that Christ by his coming has changed nothing [i.e. war and violence] in that respect” (4.20.12). In other words, Christ came to bring a spiritual kingdom, not to change the present one. This kind of logic has made it possible to kill hundreds of thousands of people since Calvin’s time. But then must we ask Calvin: “What does Jesus mean when he prays, ‘May God’s will be done on Earth as it is in Heaven’ mean?” Does nationalism exist in God’s heaven? Will heaven’s borders have tanks, drones, or angelic national security guards? How does someone who’s faith demands of them a respect and love for all people, especially the poor and marginalized, would want to even wield a gun, or even be violent? What say ye, Calvin?   

I am reminded of “Garden” by The Collection

“So I shot a man in Afghanistan, he was bleeding on me 

then he said his name was Jesus and he never had an army 

as he took his dying breath, the last thing that he thought he’d tell me is 

“It’s better to die for nothing than to kill just for your country””

Sure, Calvin does not tickle my fancy when it comes to war, but will this affect my reading of him as I go further into the Presbyterian rabbit hole? I’m not sure. 

What I am sure of that is there are many other faithful Christian anti-war/pro-peace advocates whom I adore and look to for inspiration including these two incredible women, Dorothy Day and Mother Teresa:

Dorothy Day and Mother Teresa, New York, 1979

 

*Still disappointed that President Obama did not fulfill his promise to shut it down.

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Sunday Reading

bft’s reading/listening/watching list (8/28)

Here’s what I’ve been listening to and reading this week. Enjoy! 

Music

Two great subversively religiously albums released this last week. 

The Chairman Dances ‘Time Without Measure’

Time Without Measure

I can’t stop raving about this album! Just look at the track titles. When Dorothy Day and Peter Maurin are in the first song, you gotta know it’s going to be good. 

Dorothy Day and Peter Maurin
Augustine
Fannie Lou Hamer
Thérèse
Jimmy Carter
César Chávez
Kitty Ferguson
Catonsville 9 (Thomas and Marjorie)
Peter Gomes and Nancy Koehn
Dietrich Bonhoeffer

The Collection: Ars Moriendi B-Sides
The Collection has imaginative lyrics, a profound message of peace, and a joyful sound.

Article

Hypercarceration: A Neoliberal Response to “Surplus Population”
by Jan Rehmann

This was written by my mentor and thesis advisor, Dr. Rehmann. 

Abstract:

The skyrocketing increase of U.S. incarceration rates from the late 1970s onward indicates a particular neoliberal response to what Marx analyzed as the deep-structural production of “surplus population” by capital. This essay reevaluates the classic contributions of Marx and of Rusche and Kirchheimer and relates them to approaches that emphasize racial continuity, from “convict leasing” to the “New Jim Crow” of the current incarceration system. What is needed is a multifaceted approach that accounts for the overdetermination of class and race relations. Today’s U.S. prison system is a particular way of “managing” the devastating social consequences of high-tech capitalism that has lost its hegemonic ability to mobilize its subjects on a “voluntary” basis. A part of the surplus population needs to be sacrificed in a theatrical spectacle in order to keep the working class, the poor, and the threatened middle class complacent and under control.

Sad News

Detroit’s Heidelberg Project will be dismantled over the next two years

I go to the Heidelberg Project every time I visit Detroit. This imaginative folk street art will surely be missed! 

Heldiberg

Snapped this when I visited this past January.

Quiz

What Garden of Earthly Delights Abomination Are You?

I got butt gardener.

 

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