LGBTQI+, Liberation Theology, Queer Theology, Queering the Stations of the Cross(es), Scripture

Queering the Stations of the Cross(es): The cross is laid on Simon of Cyrene

The cross is laid on Simon of Cyrene

in the gospels, we already met a simon, simon peter.

he was foolish, but brave.

the one who made the confession that jesus was the messiah (matthew 16:16).

now that jesus bears the cross, he is found nowhere near: a run away.

a new simon was found, one who was trustworthy and strong, simon of cyrene.

where’s the in-between simon?

the simon, like me, who you can tell silly secrets to without shame.

where’s the in-between simon who needs some friends to help carry the cross with them.

where am i in the story?

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Lent, Queer Theology, Queering the Stations of the Cross(es), Scripture

Queering the Stations of the Cross(es): Jesus meets his mother

(Guest post by asescalante)Jesus meets his mother

While he was still speaking to the crowds, his mother and his brothers were standing outside, wanting to speak to him. Someone told him, “Look, your mother and your brothers are standing outside, wanting to speak to you.” But to the one who had told him this, Jesus replied, “Who is my mother, and who are my brothers?” And pointing to his disciples, he said, “Here are my mother and my brothers! For whoever does the will of my Mother in heaven is my brother and sister and mother.” Matthew 12:46-50

 

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LGBTQI+, Queer Theology, Queering the Stations of the Cross(es), Scripture

Queering the Stations of the Cross(es): Jesus falls thrice times

(Guest post by asescalante)

Like the many before him who would fall, and the many after who will fall, Jesus falls. Under the weight of that which will eventually kill him he falls; this weight is not simply the physical burden of wooden beam(s), but is the weight of the Empire that would find the innocent guilty, the weight of your closest friends abandoning you in your time of need, the weight of public humiliation—the weight under which Jesus falls is the weight of physical, societal, psychological, emotional pain.

The failure of Jesus is the impossibility of his message: love your enemies; the kin-dom of God is within you; who is my mother? Paradoxical, confusing, and secretive, that which Jesus taught and lived was a message that’s whole intention was the subverting of that same weight that would later crush him.

May we fall; may we fail.

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LGBTQI+, Queering the Stations of the Cross(es), Scripture

Queering the Stations of the Cross(es): Jesus carries the cross

Crosses were not places of forgiveness, but of hate, torture, and death. Imagine carrying your death weapon, which will be used to kill you later that day. Horrible! Yet, isn’t this how some treat those in the LGBTQ+ community, or immigrants, or of different races? Their bodies become the cross. Rather than love and respect their bodies and identities, they are their own torture weapons.Our bodies should be blessed, not crosses!

LITANIES TO MY HEAVENLY BROWN BODY (CONTD):

BLESSED ARE THE SISSIES

BLESSED ARE THE BOI DYKES

BLESSED ARE THE PEOPLE OF COLOR MY BELOVED KITH AND KIN

BLESSED ARE THE TRANS

BLESSED ARE THE HIGH FEMMES

BLESSED ARE THE SEX WORKERS

BLESSED ARE THE AUTHENTIC

BLESSED ARE THE DIS-IDENTIFIERS

BLESSED ARE THE GENDER ILLUSIONISTS

BLESSED ARE THE NON-NORMATIVE

BLESSED ARE THE GENDERQUEERS

BLESSED ARE THE KINKSTERS

BLESSED ARE THE DISABLED

BLESSED ARE THE HOT FAT GIRLS

BLESSED ARE THE WEIRDO-QUEERS

BLESSED IS THE SPECTRUM

BLESSED IS CONSENT

BLESSED IS RESPECT

BLESSED ARE THE BELOVED WHO I DIDN’T DESCRIBE, I COULDN’T DESCRIBE, WILL LEARN TO DESCRIBE AND RESPECT AND LOVE

Amen.

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Queer Theology, Queering the Stations of the Cross(es), Scripture

Queering the Stations of the Cross(es): Jesus is condemned to death

Jesus was condemned to crucifixion on that fateful day by the Roman Empire. Jesus disturbed the peace, ruptured the temple-industrial complex, and was not pacifying anytime soon. If we take a much-needed step back, historically, Pilate and governors before and after him condemned thousands of others too. Once  in the early first century, a Roman road was scattered with crucified Jewish bodies, hundreds of them.

One’s condemnation allows for others’ freedom. The condemnation of Jesus let another rebel-rouser go free, named Jesus Barabbas (Matt. 27:17). Just to be clear though, Jesus the Christ was guilty. He was guilty of flipping the money-changers tables in the Temple. He was guilty of teaching against/broadening the Jewish law. Yet, what about the people historically and presently who are not guilty, but are condemned? What about the Emmett Tills of the world? Or the innocent children destined in the school-to-prison-pipeline? Or those who immigrated to the US for a chance just to survive?

Jesus was condemned to a cross.
Others to hangings.
Others to lynchings.
Others to life in prison.
And others to a life of hiding.

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