Christmas, Liberation Theology, Radical Commentary

christmas on the margins

Into this world, this demented inn, in which there is absolutely no room for him at all, Christ has come uninvited. But because he cannot be at home in it, because he is out of place in it, his place is with those others for whom there is no room. Christ’s place is with those who do not belong, who are rejected by power because they are regarded as weak, those who are discredited, who are denied the status of persons, who are tortured, bombed, and exterminated. With those for whom there is no room, Christ is present in the world. Christ is mysteriously present in those for whom there seems to be nothing but the world at its worst … With these Christ conceals himself, in these he hides himself, for whom there is no room.

– Thomas Merton

 
The manger scene was never meant to only be lifted up as a story of humble beginnings. The Christmas story is about survival under an Empire. Mary and Joseph could not find a room because they did not fit anywhere else but in a barn. And I wonder how many other people, not including the animals, were present for Jesus’ birth. How many others were displaced on that holy night? And how many people continue to be displaced today through climate change, governments abusing their citizens, and the long arms of global capitalism forcing whole societies to be reconfigured under its gaze?

This Christmas I am praying for Syrian and all refugees that they may find a safe place to reside.

I am praying for those caught up in the prison industrial complex that we can begin to abolish prisons in 2016.

I am praying for immigrants everywhere that they might start again wherever their destination.

I am praying for those struggling for another world, where black lives matter, where direct democracy reigns, and the Earth is treated with dignity that I too may be part of the struggle.

I pray for the poor and the poor in spirit that they may find communities of love and resistance.

May you encounter the manger scenes that surround you everyday and be transformed by them.

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#StayWokeAdvent, Christmas

the politics of christmas zine

Recently, I helped host an event with the Poverty Initiative titled The Politics of Christmas and the Roman Empire. We sang Christmas songs, snacked on Christmas cookies, sipped hot chocolate, and learned how the birth narratives of Jesus are counter to the Roman Empire’s ideology. Once we finish the curriculum for the program, I will post it on black flag theology.

The one exception is that I am finished with the zine I made for the event. Here it is:

Christmas zine (reading)

Christmas zine (printing)

Enjoy!

cat in a manger secene

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Advent, Christainity, Christmas, Subversive Carols

Subversive Carols: Little Drummer Boy

This series will interpret our beloved Christmas and Advent carols not as sentimental songs, but as a challenge to the status quo. Many of these subversive themes are already found in the lyrics, yet are often not pointed out. Enjoy the 12 days of Subversive Carols!

“The Little Drummer Boy” by Katherine Kennicott Davis

Come they told me, pa rum pum pum pum
A new born king to see, pa rum pum pum pum
Our finest gifts we bring, pa rum pum pum pum
To lay before the king, pa rum pum pum pum,
rum pum pum pum, rum pum pum pum,

So to honor him, pa rum pum pum pum,
When we come.

Little baby, pa rum pum pum pum
I am a poor boy too, pa rum pum pum pum
I have no gift to bring, pa rum pum pum pum
That’s fit to give the king, pa rum pum pum pum,
rum pum pum pum, rum pum pum pum,

Shall I play for you, pa rum pum pum pum,
On my drum?

Mary nodded, pa rum pum pum pum
The ox and lamb kept time, pa rum pum pum pum
I played my drum for him, pa rum pum pum pum
I played my best for him, pa rum pum pum pum,
rum pum pum pum, rum pum pum pum,

Then he smiled at me, pa rum pum pum pum
Me and my drum.

My first church music performance was “The Little Drummer Boy.” At the time I was in fourth grade and I played the snare drum while my dad sang and played guitar. Of course I was nervous so I wanted to look nice and wore a festive tie, just in case I messed up the rhythm. Everything went well and I haven’t stopped playing music in church. Trying to pick on version that I find to be my favorite is difficult since there are over 220 versions. Here’s a new version by Pentatonix.

Upon looking into “The Little Drummer Boy,” I found no history in the anti-war movement or even being overtly political. Originally it was titled “Carol of the Drum” written for chorale groups in 1941 by Katherine Kennicott Davis. So let’s take a look at the lyrics:

The song itself holds many assumptions about the Christmas narrative. Clearly, the songwriter had in mind Matthew’s Gospel, since his Gospel is the only one that includes the Magi. In the song, the Magi ask the drummer boy to accompany them as they bring their finest gifts. Our first radical eruption comes by way of “a new born king.” A king who has just been born does not have power. He can’t speak, act in an intelligent way, or think cogently. Everything the king does is done through the will of his mother.

Second, why would these Magi bring their finest gifts to a newborn king who cannot appreciate them? This is not wise, but wasteful. These Magi are trying to gain honor and respect through such an act and upholding the status quo.

Now we arrive to the little drummer boy. He tells the king-babe that he is young, poor, and without any gifts for him. Let’s pause here, the little drummer talks to the little baby? His breath is wasted. When he asks if he can play his drum for him, it is not the child who responds, but his mother. We should too acknowledge that Jesus is never named. The only person in the carol named is Mary!

Then, when the tiny drummer plays his drums for the baby, the surrounding community contributes to it. The drummer’s small gift grows vastly when he begins to play. The ox and lamb are essentially playing the kick drum. Mary both gives a nod for him to play then too enjoys it by continue nodding to the beat. And the baby-king smiles for the drummer.

The most important point in this song is that everyone is enjoying the drumming. The Magis gifts are forgotten. It is the presence of the drummer and his song rather than the presents of the Magi. It is not the consumption of gifts that fulfills the king-baby, but through the presence of others. This song thus mocks the Magis for their gifts, and upholds the drummer for his gift that is not seen as precious as the gifts of the Magi.

little drummer

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Advent, Christainity, Christmas, Subversive Carols

Subversive Carols: Do You Hear What I Hear?

This series will interpret our beloved Christmas and Advent carols not as sentimental songs, but as a challenge to the status quo. Many of these subversive themes are already found in the lyrics, yet are often overlooked. Enjoy the 12 days of Subversive Carols!

Do you hear what I hear? by  Noël Regney and music by Gloria Shayne Baker

Said the night wind to the little lamb,
do you see what I see
Way up in the sky, little lamb,
do you see what I see
A star, a star, dancing in the night
With a tail as big as a kite
With a tail as big as a kite

Said the little lamb to the shepherd boy,
do you hear what I hear
Ringing through the sky, shepherd boy,
do you hear what I hear
A song, a song, high above the trees
With a voice as big as the sea
With a voice as big as the sea

Said the shepherd boy to the mighty king,
do you know what I know
In your palace warm, mighty king,
do you know what I know
A child, a child shivers in the cold
Let us bring him silver and gold
Let us bring him silver and gold

Said the king to the people everywhere,
listen to what I say
Pray for peace, people everywhere!
listen to what I say
The Child, the Child, sleeping in the night
He will bring us goodness and light
He will bring us goodness and light

“Do You Hear What I Hear?” has consistently been my favorite Christmas carol. I especially love Sufjan Stevens’  version. On researching this carol, I was surprised to discover  this little nugget in the writer’s NYT obituary: “Written in 1962 during the Cuban Missile Crisis, “Do You Hear What I Hear?” was intended to be a plea for peace.” Thus we can gather two things from this statement. It is a rather new song, unlike Silent Night (1818), and it has political implications. This Christmas song was a creative way to protest for peace.

Now let’s take a look at the lyrics. The movements in the song are what I find most captivating: the night wind, the little lamb, the shepherd boy, the king, and all the people. In our political discourse, the political elite and the media hold the power of knowledge on current and world events. “Do You Hear What I Hear?” reverses this discourse and begins with the earthy, something anyone can engage: the night wind. The night wind is the first one to know and share the secret of peace.

We then find the little lamb listening to the night wind’s message. Again no human interaction has taken place. The Earth and her creatures know of Divine peace and love before humanity is even touched by it. Our first human touch of the peace secret comes to the socially lowest person in the world. In the time of Jesus, shepherds were the marginalized. They were sent to be with the sheep because society rejected them. They were the weak ones, the ones without political and economic power. Understanding this theologically, the Divine comes to the least of these before God/She appears to the elite.

In the next verse, we take a leap in social status. The shepherd boy appears before the king, the authority in political/social life, and offers him peace. The king listens to these words and takes them to heart. And in the last verse, the king gives up his kingship and tells all of the people that there is someone who will bring peace to all. The carol ends with the king singing that the child of peace “will bring us goodness and light.”

In conclusion, this song flips our notions of the Divine relation to humankind since the Divine first speaks to non-humans. Our concepts of power too must be overturned and reevaluated, possibly for a radical cosmopolitanism, where the Earth will be treated equally as a person.

Listen deeply to non-humans, their vision of Divine peace is radiating.

Night Wind to the Little Lamb

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