Lent, LGBTQI+, Queer Theology, Queering the Stations of the Cross(es), Scripture

Queering the Stations of the Cross(es): Jesus meets the women of Jerusalem

Jesus tells the women not to weep for him, but for themselves and their children.Weeping is a way of resistance. Empires cannot handle chaos, emotion, or uncontrollability. The powers-that-be need the world to be dry-eyed, controllable, and at an Imperial peace. These women’s tears started the revolution. Their tears were sown into the hearts of the early followers and created a movement.

“Woman, Why Are You Weeping” by Jane Kenyon

They have taken away my Lord, a person
whose life I held inside me. I saw him
heal, and teach, and eat among sinners.
I saw him break the sabbath to make a higher
sabbath. I saw him lose his temper.

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LGBTQI+, Queer Theology, Queering the Stations of the Cross(es), Scripture

Queering the Stations of the Cross(es): A woman wipes the face of Jesus

Wiping Jesus’s face on his way to death is seen as an act of charity, hinting at justice, a justice-to-come. In the Catholic tradition, the woman’s named Veronica, which in Greek means “true image.” A true image of God touches a true image of God.

A Prayer:

Wounded God, Helpless Savior,
Our readied hands seek to help. Our palms are wide open.Help us to discern how to bring about the kin-dom of misfits and no-bodies. Guide us in empathy toward the battered, bruised, hurt, broken, and hated. Push us in the direction of justice beyond charity. Amen.

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LGBTQI+, Liberation Theology, Queer Theology, Queering the Stations of the Cross(es), Scripture

Queering the Stations of the Cross(es): The cross is laid on Simon of Cyrene

The cross is laid on Simon of Cyrene

in the gospels, we already met a simon, simon peter.

he was foolish, but brave.

the one who made the confession that jesus was the messiah (matthew 16:16).

now that jesus bears the cross, he is found nowhere near: a run away.

a new simon was found, one who was trustworthy and strong, simon of cyrene.

where’s the in-between simon?

the simon, like me, who you can tell silly secrets to without shame.

where’s the in-between simon who needs some friends to help carry the cross with them.

where am i in the story?

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Lent, Queer Theology, Queering the Stations of the Cross(es), Scripture

Queering the Stations of the Cross(es): Jesus meets his mother

(Guest post by asescalante)Jesus meets his mother

While he was still speaking to the crowds, his mother and his brothers were standing outside, wanting to speak to him. Someone told him, “Look, your mother and your brothers are standing outside, wanting to speak to you.” But to the one who had told him this, Jesus replied, “Who is my mother, and who are my brothers?” And pointing to his disciples, he said, “Here are my mother and my brothers! For whoever does the will of my Mother in heaven is my brother and sister and mother.” Matthew 12:46-50

 

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LGBTQI+, Queer Theology, Queering the Stations of the Cross(es), Scripture

Queering the Stations of the Cross(es): Jesus falls thrice times

(Guest post by asescalante)

Like the many before him who would fall, and the many after who will fall, Jesus falls. Under the weight of that which will eventually kill him he falls; this weight is not simply the physical burden of wooden beam(s), but is the weight of the Empire that would find the innocent guilty, the weight of your closest friends abandoning you in your time of need, the weight of public humiliation—the weight under which Jesus falls is the weight of physical, societal, psychological, emotional pain.

The failure of Jesus is the impossibility of his message: love your enemies; the kin-dom of God is within you; who is my mother? Paradoxical, confusing, and secretive, that which Jesus taught and lived was a message that’s whole intention was the subverting of that same weight that would later crush him.

May we fall; may we fail.

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Queer Theology, Queering the Stations of the Cross(es), Scripture

Queering the Stations of the Cross(es): Jesus is condemned to death

Jesus was condemned to crucifixion on that fateful day by the Roman Empire. Jesus disturbed the peace, ruptured the temple-industrial complex, and was not pacifying anytime soon. If we take a much-needed step back, historically, Pilate and governors before and after him condemned thousands of others too. Once  in the early first century, a Roman road was scattered with crucified Jewish bodies, hundreds of them.

One’s condemnation allows for others’ freedom. The condemnation of Jesus let another rebel-rouser go free, named Jesus Barabbas (Matt. 27:17). Just to be clear though, Jesus the Christ was guilty. He was guilty of flipping the money-changers tables in the Temple. He was guilty of teaching against/broadening the Jewish law. Yet, what about the people historically and presently who are not guilty, but are condemned? What about the Emmett Tills of the world? Or the innocent children destined in the school-to-prison-pipeline? Or those who immigrated to the US for a chance just to survive?

Jesus was condemned to a cross.
Others to hangings.
Others to lynchings.
Others to life in prison.
And others to a life of hiding.

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Lent, Queer Theology, Queering the Stations of the Cross(es), Scripture

Queering Holy Week: A Primer

For Holy Week, I will take up a new project titled, “Queering the Stations of the Cross(es).” In the last few months, beautiful artwork on LGBTQ Stations have emerged; as well as a specifically Trans-queering the Stations of the Cross. These are wonderful additions to the Christian imagination surrounding Holy Week and the Stations. For my project, I want to broadly define queer and find more ruptures in the text and tradition that include, but are not limited to LGBTQQIAAP+ theory/theology. For this reason, I am using David Halerpin’s definition of queer,

“by definition, whatever is at odds with the normal, the legitimate, the dominant. There is nothing in particular to which it necessarily refers… ‘Queer’…demarcates not a positivity but a positionality vis-à-vis the normative—a positionality that is not restricted to lesbians and gay men” (p. 62).

In other words, queer destabilizes all sense of norms. It does this not for its own sake; rather, for a clearer (queerer) sense of the world we live in. Presently, essences categorize and suffocate the Earth (nature, animals, who gets to rule) and humanity (heteronormativity, racist perceptions). Just as one’s eye color differs from another, so do our tastes, sexualities, epistemologies, and much more. Queering disrupts the status quo and brings discomforts us. Isn’t this what religion attempts to do or at least certain movements of it?

The season of Lent, especially the Stations of the Cross, needs queering. Sacrificing meals or praying once a day comforts one’s spiritual life. Problematizing and queering the stations of the cross invites us to see our tradition with fresh eyes.

So won’t you please join me in “Queering the Stations of the Cross(es)”? 

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