re-thinking economics, theology, and politics for a better future

The Guardian posted an article, “Mainstream economics is in denial: the world has changed“, challenging economists who teach of the greatness of our  global economic system. In Great Britain, economists in higher education dare not speak against global capitalism or even teach about the 2009 economic crisis. Clearly, this is ideology. These economists are riding onContinue reading “re-thinking economics, theology, and politics for a better future”

poets against the status quo

Perhaps––who knows––He tires of looking down. Those eyes are never lifted. Never straight. Perhaps sometimes He tires of being great In solitude. Without a hand to hold. – the last stanza of “The Preacher: Ruminates Behind the Sermon” by Gwendolyn Brooks In Plato’s Republic, poets were only welcome if they wrote praises to the gods. No versesContinue reading “poets against the status quo”

desert ascetics in the land of plenty

God in Pain: Inversions of Apocalypse released last year and was co-written by Slavoj Zizek and Boris Gunjevic. Re-reading it again for a third time, I am enjoying the chapters written by Gunjevic even more. Gunjevic uses St. Augustine’s City of God as an ethical playbook to destroy capitalism. In the quote below, Gunjevic writes that to subvertContinue reading “desert ascetics in the land of plenty”

stitching together a new us narrative

All ancient and contemporary nations form myths of their genesis. Specifically in the ancient world, myths were written as creation narratives. The ancient Babylonians wrote the Enuma Elish in which the god Marduk killed Tiamat, another god, and created the world out of her disassembled body. Later in the story, humans were created out ofContinue reading “stitching together a new us narrative”

the messiah came; we were just too busy looking at our cell phones

Jesus’ second coming filled my thoughts as a young child. In my apocalyptic vision, Jesus descended from heaven, trumpets sounded, and saved persons were raptured into heaven. On Earth there would be years of torment for those who weren’t Christians, and after seven years, Jesus would come back again (third coming?) to see if anyone would believeContinue reading “the messiah came; we were just too busy looking at our cell phones”

snowden, leaks, and the us empire

Thank goodness for the recent discussions of surveillance in the US. I find them simultaneously encouraging and missing the point. The Powers-that-be are currently struggling to give answers for these recent leaks. The internet has become so dangerous that one Pentagon official said “We have developed a full range of capabilities to operate in the cyber-domain, butContinue reading “snowden, leaks, and the us empire”

radical desert theology and subverting the norm II

This past weekend I attended and participated in Subverting the Norm 2 in Springfield, MO. Over 200 people were in attendance, and radical theology was preached by the speakers. I spent much of the time in conversation with people who were just introduced to the tenants of this form of theology. Peter Rollins, Jack Caputo,Continue reading “radical desert theology and subverting the norm II”

subverting the norm II!

This coming weekend I am presenting my paper “Approaching Youth Ministry through a Post-Structural Lens” at Subverting the Norm II in Springfield, MO. Here is my abstract: A postmodern mood fills the halls of youth ministries everywhere. We re-work tradition with liturgies, candles, and video clips. Youth play games one moment and the next learn theContinue reading “subverting the norm II!”

theologically imagining a new atonement theory

Easter arrives in a few weeks. The Church will celebrate the crucifixion, death, burial and eventual rising of Jesus the Christ. So much meaning is packed into one weekend. Altars are torn down, darkness floods the tenebrae service, and on Easter Sunday some church members have the opportunity to wake as the sun rises to worship the God ofContinue reading “theologically imagining a new atonement theory”

hunger, lent, and stewardship

On Sunday morning at church, the layspeaker opened the service saying that everything is relative. We may think that it is cold outside, but those living in Minnesota have it worse with temperatures in the negative Fahrenheit. Then on a side note hunger also was relative. This was a strange way to talk about relativism,Continue reading “hunger, lent, and stewardship”