Ecology, Sermon

our host, the earth: a sermon

I had the honor of sharing my sermon with a church plant I’ve been part of for the last few months in NYC. 

Psalm 93 
God rules justly, robed in beautiful majesty;
the Mighty One is robed, girded with strength.
God has established the world; it shall never be moved;
your throne is established from of old;
you are from everlasting.
The floods have lifted up, O God,
the floods have lifted up their voice;
the floods lift up their roaring.
More majestic than the thunders of mighty waters,
more majestic than the waves of the sea,
majestic on high is the Lord!
Your decrees are very sure;
holiness befits your house,
O Lord, forevermore.

Revelation 12:13-17 
So when the dragon saw that he had been thrown down to the Earth, he pursued the woman who had given birth to the male child. But the woman was given the two wings of the great eagle, so that she could fly from the serpent into the wilderness, to her place where she is nourished for a time, and times, and half a time. Then from his mouth the serpent poured water like a river after the woman, to sweep her away with the flood. But the Earth came to the help of the woman; it opened its mouth and swallowed the river that the dragon had poured from his mouth. Then the dragon was angry with the woman and went off to make war on the rest of her children, those who keep the commandments of God and hold the testimony of Jesus.

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Please pray with me: O God, the oceans are rising, during our lifetime entire species of animals have become extinct, and climate refugees increase every year. O God, our world is burning, may you burn brighter. Amen.

Today’s subject on ecology and environmentalism is close to my heart. Too many times though I’ve watched preachers or speakers take over lecterns or pulpits to talk about plenty of subjects that they do not know anything about! I myself am no climate scientist but have a few friends in the fields of geology and climate science, that I’ve bounced what I’m going to share about with them.

As for me a few my credentials, within the Presbyterian world last Spring I planned a  weekend retreat for Young Presbys. Our theme was intersectional environmentalism. As well, I’m part of Fossil Free PC(USA) which encourages the denomination to divest from fossil fuels. It has unfortunately failed the last two General Assemblies, but we will not give up!

Last but not least I got into this work after I spent two weeks in Iraqi Kurdistan on a peace delegation with Christian Peacemaker Teams and Presbyterian Peace Fellowship. We heard stories from villages across Iraqi Kurdistan who do not have clean water or fertile land to farm because oil companies extract crude oil using toxic chemicals. A brief historical side note, Saddam Hussein hated the Kurds and would not allow oil companies to enter Iraqi Kurdistan. This was to make sure that their economy would suffer. It wasn’t until US troops invaded the country in 2003 with Operation Iraqi Freedom that Iraqi Kurds tasted the abundance of black gold. Oil companies started to enter villages promising hospitals, schools, and jobs, yet sadly, none of it came about. More than just their land and water being toxic, their roads have destroyed by tank trucks carrying oil back and forth and these companies did not hire anyone from IK. One other note, in 2011, one year after the BP Oil Spill in the Gulf of Mexico, the disgraced CEO of BP, Tony Hayward created another oil company Genel Energy that has been in IK ever since. It’s as if he thought, where’s the next place, people, and creatures I can exploit…

Ok so those are some of my more recent environmental credentials. Yet, my childhood was full of nature adventures. I was born and raised in Western Maryland and just went back for Thanksgiving with my family. Western Maryland is a thin part of state and the Appalachian Mountains go through it. In a way I grew up hickish, but because of the internet and my music preferences I began to dissociate myself with the culture in my teens. Yet when I was a child, I loved playing in our small creek, (or as I used to call it a crick) next to our house. There I made friends with crayfish, worms, turtles, and dragonflies. I loved that area so much that every summer I used our farming tools to cut down the thorn bushes next to the creek. Looking back on it, I think I wanted to help clean up “the house” of my creature friends. Sadly, since then, every time I go back to the creek, the thorn bushes have taken over.

Now this seems like a good segue into stewardship, to care for our common home. But it’s too dang easy to do that. Honestly, I’m tired of those kinds of conversations. Stewardship seems to focus on the individual instead of the entire system. Yes, yes, please keep up the work of reducing, reusing, and recycling. And as my grandmother taught me, “Think about your need of an item three times, before you purchase it.” Or maybe today it should be updated to say something about not going on shopping apps late at night to tiredly or drunkenly order items.

Stewardship, for me, portrays the same idea that I get from servant leadership. Both believe that because one person changes their actions to be more conscience of how they treat the Earth or one another that things will change. Just because you can be friends with your boss now that they practice servant leadership doesn’t mean that the system is not still inherently oppressive. Rather in a way both of these ideas point to feeling good about yourself. Not that you shouldn’t, but really that’s not the life Christ has called us to.

One other small rabbit hole about stewardship: we have come to think of ourselves as consumers and others treat us as so. Nowadays stewardship seems to be tied to consumerism. I’m sure you remember after that wretched day on 9/11. To comfort US citizens, President Bush said to continue shopping or to even go to Disneyland. In other words, live care-free and keeping buying! But Thank God, we are more than consumers.
We are called by God to be a spirit empowered community!
We are called to follow a Jesus who taught abundance, not scarcity! We are called to be in the Way of injustice and to lift up love! Thanks be!
So if I’m not going to speak our ethical and moral obligation to one another and to God, what am I going to speak on? Interdependence, of course.
These past two weeks we saw a full display of environmental interdependence.

At the beginning of last week, we learned that the Mid Atlantic experienced smoke from California’s wildfires. Even if we think that we are exempt from this tragedy, think again.
Nearly 14,000 homes were destroyed
84 people have died, so far
605 people are still missing
And around 52,000 people have been displaced.
May God be with them!

On Thanksgiving, after eating my meal, I was scrolling through Twitter, and saw Mari Copeny’s tweet “Went through a 40 pack of water cooking Thanksgiving Dinner.” Flint, MI still does not have clean water.

Then on Black Friday, the Fourth National Climate Assessment was released. President George HW Bush signed The Global Change Research Act of 1990 which mandates that the U.S. Global Change Research Program (USGCRP) deliver a report to Congress and the President no less than every four years. This Administration purposely posted the fourth report on Black Friday in hopes that it would be buried by other news.

This report is stark, showing how “Climate change creates new risks and exacerbates existing vulnerabilities in communities across the United States, presenting growing challenges to human health and safety, quality of life, and the rate of economic growth.”
When I listened to NPR interview one of the scientists on this project, he said, “It’s no longer about how climate change will affect our children or grandchildren. It’s happening now.” And to that I say God help us all.

And a little more news about Black Friday, much shopping was done. One shopper was shot and two were stabbed in disputes over items. This is disturbing, but sadly not surprising.

Today’s passages seem to be conversation partners about the Earth.
In Psalm 93, we hear of a God who is majestic and in control. Today in the Christian Calendar is Reign of Christ Sunday, so it makes sense why this passage would be chosen.

The middle section reads:
“God has established the world;
it shall never be moved;

your throne is established from of old;
you are from everlasting.
The floods have lifted up, O God,
the floods have lifted up their voice;
the floods lift up their roaring.”

In the ancient worlds of Mesopotamia and Canaan, divine kingship was established by victory over the sea and the deep. Our passage speaks of a God who not only controls the world and waters, but that they are roaring and lifting up their voice to God.

I think it’s beautiful to bless God’s majesty, but I think this passage is referring to a bit more. The water speaks, shows kindness and love, and even praises the Creator. As a child I think I was more in tune with that. In tune with how at my parent’s flower shop, dish gardens could liven up when I’d sing to them, with how the clayfish stopped pinching me after they got to know me after a while, how the tree I planted on Arbor Day in the mid 90’s grew and grew on the side of my hill because I would visit with it every day. 
The seas and Earth worship God. Are we paying attention or are our headphones blocking out such adoration?

Our second passage from Revelation is a doozy. I remember reading it for the first time in seminary in a class dedicated to Revelation and being blown away.

Let me give you a little context. When we think about Christmas narratives, we often head to Matthew or Luke for the story of Jesus being born in Bethlehem. The writer of Revelation though has a different idea. A cosmic woman, who we can assume is a Mary-like figure is in heaven and she’s pregnant. She starts to go into labor and the dragon, Satan, is also in heaven waiting for the baby to be born. This starts Revelation 12. Cosmic Woman and Dr. Dragon. This sounds like a band that I’d go watch. Anyway, as she births the male child, he is snatched away by an angel and taken to God’s throne. A war then breaks out in heaven. The cosmic woman heads to Earth for refuge. And here’s where our verses begin. 

Every time I read this, I am in awe. The cosmic woman is nourished in the wilderness. One note about the wilderness in books attributed to John. The wilderness functions as a place of witness (John 1:23), salvific healing (3:14), provision (6:31, 49), and protection (11:54). All of these are present in this passage. The cosmic women bears witness to God’s glory and protection, by resting in a place God had prepared, and she’s offered protection.

The Earth fights for the woman. Often when we read Scripture or think generally about the Earth, it’s always passive or reactive. We have more intense hurricanes because of climate change. The Earth is not doing it; rather we have created this situation.

Yet it’s time for us to think of the Earth, not as only creation, but as a creature. A creature that speaks, reacts, fights, and heals.

Our lives are intertwined with the Earth, whether we know it or not. The Earth is not just our home, but in a way our host. The Earth has everything that we need to survive and thrive.

I was listening to the rather strange philosopher Slavoj Zizek earlier this week. He’s written tons on ideology and was sharing about when he debates with others on environmental issues. He said that all they do is quote disparaging facts to him. Then, he says something I’ve never him his say before, “The function of Ideology is no longer to paint an idealized image, like that the world is not as bad as we think or that things can get better. Nor is ideology even used to oppress much, state power already does that. Today ideology kills hope.” May we not allow our hope to be killed by being overwhelmed by facts and figures.

Fight for the Earth.jpg

All sermons are fragments. Pieces of a puzzle in a box without a picture. This certainly stands true for my sermon. Out of this mess though I have a few conclusions:

I. Be vigilant
As I said earlier keep up with reduce, reuse, and recycle. Try not to buy as much. Discern each purchase.

II. Be proactive
The Historian Howard Zinn was right. It’s not always the lawmakers who change the world, but it’s those who take to the streets.
He said, “We don’t have to engage in grand, heroic actions to participate in the process of change. Small acts, when multiplied by millions of people, can transform the world.”

III. Promote the commons
I took a train from my parents’ house back to Philly yesterday. A trip that I’ve made many times, but during my layover in DC’s Union Station, I noticed that the benches I used to sit on were all gone. The only places to sit were ones where I had to buy a meal or coffee. We need to create spaces where one does not need to buy anything! Let’s not privatize any more of the world.

IV. Fight back
Communities of color are on the frontlines of climate change. Need I remind you of New Orleans, Puerto Rico, the droughts in Somalia and other countries in Africa. We must amplify their stories and struggles. Climate change refugees have been created because of us. May we open our arms wide in hospitality and love.

As we continue to do our part to struggle against this Administration’s lack of compassion. May we remember that God always stands on the side of the poor and oppressed, that means the Earth too. May we stand as a community with God, no matter the risk. Amen.

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Justice

rest in power, dr. cone

Today, Dr. James Hal Cone died. 

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I started reading him in undergrad. Through his books, I came to the realization that I can be political in my own theology. I even wrote a blog post attempting to use Dr. Cone’s theology to critique Flannery O’Connor: the compassion of the christ: taking christian theology serious for the sake of society. I continue to think of him when I write anything theological. 

I first met Dr. Cone at the Free Library of Philadelphia in December, 2012, when he was on The Cross and the Lynching Tree book tour. I found my notes from his talk. I wrote down:

“You cannot let despair have the last word.”

“Do not give up any form of resistance. It’s all an expression of hope.”

These statements have not left me. 

I will always remember Dr. Cone as a humble and gentle man. In his classes, he was personal and cared for us. What I appreciate about him most is the way his theology changed over the years. In his earlier books, he didn’t seem to take into account Black women’s experiences or Queer experiences. In later Prefaces of God of the Oppressed, he repents and started to incorporate it into his own theology. 

I am deeply thankful to have known Dr. Cone. You will be missed. 

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Liberation Theology, theology

how wide is your theological imagination?

One of the most theological imaginative ideas in the last 50 years: Capitalism isn’t working. Another World is Possible!

Another World is Possible

A week before Christmas, Pastor Tim Keller tweeted:

Tim Keller 2

This comes as no surprise. For Keller, evangelicals, and other Christian conservatives, Jesus’ main objective was to forgive sins. For this reason, accordingly, Jesus was put on a cross to suffer and die. Jesus’ teachings, which concerned bringing God’s Realm to Earth, are often ignored, so that these evangelicals may put words into Jesus’ last dying breaths. 

Honestly, this tweet was easy for me to ignore. It neither brings a new perspective to evangelical theology, nor does it deny their anti-world, spiritualized theology. It confirms, once again, that for evangelicals, God is not on the side of the poor and oppressed. 

What I can’t ignore though is what Keller tweeted this week: 

Tim Keller

This is an “It’s okay to be white” tweet. A tweet that commends historical and current oppression, heteropatriarchy, and white supremacy. Keller, in this tweet, believes that God has chosen those to be blessed by surveying the genocide of Native peoples, the lynchings and slavery of black people, and second class citizenship of Latinx people, etc. For him, everything happens for a reason whether good or bad. In short, everything is ordained by God.

And yet,

a “gift of God” for one is

the stolen land of another

enslavement of another

the death of thousands for another 

and extreme poverty and despair of another

This same kind of unholy logic Keller purports could be used in the case of Erica and Eric Garner. Eric Garner, in the summer of 2014, was unjustly put in a chokehold and killed by a police officer on Staten Island for selling untaxed cigarettes. His daughter, Erica Garner, spoke out for her father’s life, against police brutality, and for a freer world. Unfortunately, her body could no longer handle the weight of systematic racism, the sorrow of her father’s death, and the despair that things will only get worse in the US under this administration. Neither of these Garners should be dead. Neither should the other countless individuals killed by police officers or the military, for that matter. These deaths are not happening because God desires them to happen, but because humanity continues to perpetuate unjust systems. 

One of the problems I find with Christian theology is a lack of imagination. For Keller and ilk, things are the way they are because God wouldn’t want them any other way. Really? This is the best God could do? If this is true, I think we should expect an apology from God. The idea that everything happens for a reason is dangerous and unimaginative,

With a lack of theological imagination:

  • systems of oppression go unchecked
  • pastors can continue with spiritual abuse (women should be subservient to men; God blesses the USA; abusers strengthen your faith; the end is coming soon, so donate your monies to the church, etc. )
  • the Earth is only temporary, God can make a new one
  • God is a caring Father, who cares about *His* children 

Maybe the question is not “How wide is your theological imagination?” but “What does your theological imagination smell like?” Mine somedays smells like the stinky compost I put on the rooftop garden at the church, or the smell my hand absorbs after shaking the hand of the volunteer who enjoys taking out the trash from the soup kitchen, or the smell of sajjige that my friend gives me after it being in her purse all day. These smells represent growth, kindness, and friendship. Things that seem to be lacking in some of our theological imaginations. 

The world is not as it should be. With the help of bolder theological imaginations, we might create, with God, a more just-filled world. 

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Scripture, Sermon

it is not about whether or not you love your neighbor, but how you do so: a sermon

I preached this sermon at Broadway Presbyterian Church in NYC on Sunday, August 20th.

A Reading from the Gospel of Luke

Just then a lawyer stood up to test Jesus.
“Teacher, what must I do to inherit eternal life?”
Jesus said to him, “What is written in the law? What do you read there?”
The lawyer answered, “You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart,
and with all your soul,
with all your strength,
and with all your mind;
and your neighbor as yourself.”
And Jesus said to him, “You have given the right answer; do this, and you will live.”

But wanting to justify himself,
The lawyer asked Jesus, “And who is my neighbor?”

Jesus replied, “A man was going down from Jerusalem to Jericho,
and fell into the hands of robbers,
who stripped him,
beat him,
and went away,
leaving him half dead.
Now by chance a priest was going down that road; and when he saw him,
he passed by on the other side.
So likewise, (by chance), a Levite, when he came to the place and saw him,
passed by on the other side.
But a Samaritan while traveling came near him;
and when he saw him,
he was moved with compassion.
The Samaritan went to him and bandaged his wounds,
having poured oil and wine on them.
Then he put him on his own animal,
brought him to an inn,
and took care of him.
Then the next day he took out two denarii,
gave them to the innkeeper, and said,
‘Take care of him; and when I come back,
I will repay you whatever more you spend.’

Which of these three, do you think, was a neighbor to the man who fell into the hands of the robbers?”
He said, “The one who showed him mercy.”
Jesus said to him (and to us), “Go and do likewise.”

He Qi, The Good Samaritan

He Qi’s The Good Samaritan

It can be difficult trying to hear with fresh senses this well tread passage. Hearing the phrase “The Good Samaritan” brings up childhood Sunday school lessons for some of us or our favorite television episodes where the main character acts with Good Samaritan compassion. And these starting points color how we hear this parable.

For me, it was when I was called a Good Samaritan after I picked up three hitchhikers at a gas station in my hometown, provided them with a meal, and a shower. Then drove them to their friend’s house two hours away. And really I was only called a “Good Samaritan” the next day after a night of being remed out by my parents. But honestly, I did it, because I was bored and wanted a disruption in my own life. In the parable there’s no sense of boredom, only honest to God compassion.

This is what I love about the parable of the Good Samaritan, it’s straightforward.

Clearly there are those who are morally corrupt: the robbers.
The morally ambiguous: the Levite and the priest.
And the moral hero: the Samaritan.
Unlike other parables too, it’s not about God’s Realm, but about the flesh and blood of this life.

When I was rereading our passage this week, I was struck by all the times the Samaritan touched this bloodied man.

And a quick but important side note: the robbers were not just stealing this man’s wallet, but attempting to take his life.

Now back to the compassionate Samaritan:
First, upon seeing the half dead man, he bends down, wraps up his bloodied body, pouring oil and wine on the wounds.
Next he puts the now bandaged man onto his animal or donkey and ride to the Inn.
At the inn, they stay the night, probably in the same room.
I can’t imagine that the Samaritan slept much that night, since he was probably checking in constantly on the man. Like a parent spending the first few nights with their newborn.
The next morning, the Samaritan gives the inn keeper money to take care of the man and that he would repay him any extra expenses.

In a way, this doesn’t sound like the parable I grew up with. I was taught a bloodless parable on felt board with characters who wore oversized Middle Eastern like clothing. And maybe this parable isn’t meant for kids. Because after spending the last two weeks with 8-11 year olds at Vacation Bible School, I can tell you that they don’t need this lesson. They’re just fine caring for those around them. It’s really for us adults.

So who is my neighbor according to Jesus?
It’s those who are within reach, who are within arm’s length.

Before I get too ahead of myself. Make no mistake about this: Jesus is calling us to be neighbors to those who are along our paths in life. It’s who you are sitting beside now. It’s who you will run into on the sidewalk after church. THEY ARE THE ONES WE ARE CALLED TO BE NEIGHBORS TO!

I stress this because often I get caught up in my own social media world. A world, that’s still real, but is not within arms reach. I can show compassion by texting emojis, but there are still men who sleep on the front steps of our church. I can send direct messages on Twitter to those in difficult life situations, but I often keep in my earbuds when I see an acquaintance who I don’t want to speak to on the sidewalk. I’m Timothy, I have other big important things to do, not just getting to know the name of the person ringing me up at Westside Market for my meatball parm sub. Because I am more often than not the priest and the Levite in this parable.

Is it because I consider myself a New Yorker now, fast walking, head down, and becoming more egocentric. I’m not sure, but Jesus is clear on this point: Know and love your neighbor.

But there’s more to this story that I’ll only touch on. You see the Levite and the priest, in a way, do nothing wrong. They’re bad neighbors, yes. Apathetic, very. But were they actively harming the man? No, of course.

The stark problem though that confronts me every time I read this passage is with our dismissal of the robbers. Why doesn’t anyone talk about why the man was in the ditch, half-dead in the first place?!

It’s complicated because you have to go back to the system.
There are robbers because they have a need.
They have a need because there’s inequality.
There’s inequality because the system was created like this.

Martin Luther King Jr. was onto this holy logic in his “Beyond Vietnam” speech when he said: “On the one hand we are called to play the good Samaritan on life’s roadside; but that will be only an initial act. One day we must come to see that the whole Jericho road must be transformed so that men and women will not be constantly beaten and robbed as they make their journey on life’s highway. True compassion is more than flinging a coin to a beggar; it is not haphazard and superficial. It comes to see that an edifice which produces beggars needs restructuring.”

Amen, but woah. Timothy are you trying to tell us that it’s not just about acting kind to those we pass by each day or that it’s not good enough to care only for my family, but that I need to challenge the system? In short, yes. But in long form: no, but also.

No, keep in touch with those around you, but also make sure if they are feeling hopeless that you comfort them.

No, don’t stop reposting articles about Heather Heyer, who was killed by a white supremacist but also live in such a way that celebrates our diverse world and keep naming white supremacy as a sin and enemy of humanity.

No, continue giving money to good organizations that fight for human rights, dignity, and a more just world, but also show deep, deep love to those struggling financially, emotionally, and physically.

This tension of living like the Good Samaritan and changing the Jericho Road is not easy. Nor is following Jesus supposed to be easy. At the end of the day, you shouldn’t be the same person as you were, but transformed by a God who loves and comforts us and expects the same from us.

I’ll end my sermon just as Jesus did:
Go and do likewise.
Go, as in leave your place of comfort and enter places where people have lost all hope.
Do it, not to be called good, since the phrase “Good Samaritan” is not found in the text itself, but do it to further bring God’s Realm on Earth.
So Go and do likewise, Amen.

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Beliefs, Bible, Spiritual

charlottesville and revelation

My church’s Pub Theology crew wanted to discuss the doctrine of Revelation. As is my custom, I created a worksheet to help start our conversation:

Working Definition: Revelation unveils the Unknown. 

What is it:
An experience, an event, an inspiration that moves one beyond the vision of the ordinary. 
Transcendent 
Transformative 

What is it not
Revelation does not provide us with all that there is to know about God. 
It does not speak against Biblical theology, i.e. it will never tell you to hate your neighbor.
It is not new information.

Sources and Sites of Revelation:
Scripture
Jesus Christ
Preaching
People
Music
Animals
Campfires
Creation
Protests
Soup Kitchens

Thomas Merton Plaque

A plaque of Thomas Merton’s famous Revelation

The Intersection of Revelation and Charlottesville 

“Flannery O’Connor depicts an event of “revelation” in a way that points to the deeper theological meaning of the term. She tells of the story of Mrs. Turpin, a hard-working, upright, church-going farmer’s wife, who is unexpectedly accosted by a mentally disturbed teenage girl in a doctor’s office. After bearing Mrs. Turpin’s superior attitude and demanding remarks about white trash and black people as long as she can, the girl suddenly throws a heavy book at Mrs. Turpin, begins to strangle her, and calls her a “warthog from hell.” When Mrs. Turpin returns to her farm, she cannot get the girl’s words out of her mind. Standing beside her pigpen, she is outraged by being called a warthog. She knows she is a good person, certainly far superior to white trash and black people. She reminds God of that, as well as of all the work she does for the church, “What did you send me a message like that for?” She angrily asks God. But as she stared into the pigpen, she has a glimpse of “the very heart of mystery,” and begins to absorb some “abysmal life-giving knowledge.” She has a vision of a parade of souls marching to heaven, with white trash, black people, lunatics, and other social outcasts up front, and respectable people like herself at the rear of the procession, the shocked expressions on their faces showing that all their virtues are being burned away. Mrs. Turpin returns to her house with shouts of hallelujah from the heaven-bound saints in her ears.”

“Revelation is an event that shakes us to the core.”

“Revelation compels momentous decisions about who God is and how we are to understand the world and ourselves.”

The previous quotes are from the tremendous book Faith Seeking Understanding by Daniel Migliore (p. 22)


Our conversation was complicated by the group constantly arguing for what I deemed as little “r” revelation. They described events that shaped new ways of visioning the world, but not necessarily with the consequences of material change. For example, someone mentioned walking in the park, feeling awestruck, and not being able to see a leaf again without thinking of God’s handiwork. This is lovely, for sure, but is not capital “R” Revelation. 

When Biblical Revelations occur, which seem to only happen to men, the recipient’s  lives are transformed. After Moses encounters God in a burning bush, he changes his path, goes back to Egypt, and joins in the liberation of the Hebrew People. Paul’s revelation of God knocks his life out of control, no longer does he kill Christians, but now he preaches a Gospel for both Jews and Gentiles. According to these Biblical Revelations, they happen when they’re least expected and one is persuaded towards a way of life-giving love. 

And oh how I pray for Revelations for politicians, CEOs, & white supremacists that they may change their ways. Often I think that people could help foster acts of Revelation. Like the teenage girl in the Flannery O’Connor tale and help others to see that their vision of the world is destructive.

I ended the conversation at Pub Theology saying that if a Revelation does not create a material change, not just a spiritual one, then you should’ve been paying closer attention.

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anti-war, Liberation Theology

our politics are still boring

At the turn of the millennium, Crimethinc produced a great and still relevant piece,Your Politics Are Boring As F*ck.” They describe how practitioners of radical political ideologies are going about things the wrong way. One delightful example posited spending the afternoon collecting food from businesses, who were going to throw it away anyway, to share it with the hungry comparing that with writing an editorial to a leftist paper about their improper use of “anarcho-syndicalism.” The article ends with a delightful list of how not to make politics boring:

  • Make politics relevant to our everyday experience of life again. The farther away the object of our political concern, the less it will mean to us, the less real and pressing it will seem to us, and the more wearisome politics will be.
  • All political activity must be joyous and exciting in itself. You cannot escape from dreariness with more dreariness.
  • To accomplish those first two steps, entirely new political approaches and methods must be created. The old ones are outdated, outmoded. Perhaps they were NEVER any good, and that’s why our world is the way it is now.
  • Enjoy yourselves! There is never any excuse for being bored… or boring!

Yet, while I thoroughly enjoy and agree with the article I think it needs to emphasize even more so: EVERY ACT WE COMMIT IS POLITICAL, whether or not we see it as such. Who one hangs out with, the city one lives in, what you buy or not buy for groceries, what you’re watching on TV, etc. etc. IT’S ALL POLITICAL! And so it seems to think that political action happens every four years is an utter and complete farce.

For me though, political discourse can be oh so boring because US politics is extremely circular. The US must always have an enemy, who appears evil and hurts their citizens. The US must threaten and at least appear to defeat such enemy for the sake of democracy. The problem though is that the US oligarchy controls our political discourse. Even in my circles, questions do not arise as to whether or not the enemy of the US government is actually the enemy of the US people. I, for sure, do not have qualms with Afghanis, Yemenis, Iraqis, North Korean citizens, and so on. Rather, those whom I disagree with and challenge are already in my community: police and local politicians.

We must move away from imperial discourse and move towards local discourse! 

Of course, this is not going to end the Tr*mp drama, but it will grant us the energy to move towards what is important: the marginalized, poor, and sick among us. In a few weeks, I’m preaching on the “Good Samaritan.”* I gather from this ancient story that your neighbor is the person spatially closest to you. In other words, it can be good to have an interest in the Middle East or Latin America, but what are you doing for your neighbors within reach. I find Jesus’ parable compelling in the fact that the Samaritan touched and bandaged the beat up, bloodied man. I often do not have the courage to act in such a way.

Our politics are boring because we’d rather spend our time and energy with those who share similar ideologies. I too am guilty of this. And it’s difficult to share with my moderate/liberal friends an anarcho-communist vision of the world. Don’t get me started on reactions to Fully Automated Luxury Gay Space Communism! Because honestly, who cares? Who cares if I can quote Marx, EZLN, and obscure theologians in the same sentence? I do, certainly! But how am I going to show compassion to those who sleep on the church steps or foster relationships with people I encounter every day because if I am not doing that then my politics should be boring.

The Good Samaritan by Christopher Ruane

The Good Samaritan by Christopher Ruane

*Luke 10:25-37
“Just then a lawyer stood up to test Jesus.
“Teacher,” he said, “what must I do to inherit eternal life?”
He said to him, “What is written in the law? What do you read there?”
He answered, “You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart,
and with all your soul, and with all your strength, and with all your mind;
and your neighbor as yourself.”
And he said to him,
“You have given the right answer; do this, and you will live.”

But wanting to justify himself,
he asked Jesus,
“And who is my neighbor?”

Jesus replied,
“A man was going down from Jerusalem to Jericho,
and fell into the hands of robbers,
who stripped him, beat him, and went away,
leaving him half dead.
Now by chance a priest was going down that road;
and when he saw him,
he passed by on the other side.
So likewise a Levite,
when he came to the place and saw him,
passed by on the other side.
But a Samaritan while traveling came near him;
and when he saw him,
he was moved with pity.
He went to him and bandaged his wounds,
having poured oil and wine on them.
Then he put him on his own animal,
brought him to an inn,
and took care of him.
The next day he took out two denarii,
gave them to the innkeeper, and said,
‘Take care of him; and when I come back,
I will repay you whatever more you spend.’
Which of these three,
do you think,
was a neighbor to the man who fell into the hands of the robbers?”
He said, “The one who showed him mercy.”
Jesus said to him, “Go and do likewise.””

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Justice, Liturgy

the nicene creed: radically revised

I was asked to write a statement of faith and because of my trust in a loving and creative Triune God, I re-wrote the ancient faith text, the Nicene Creed, to represent my ever-Reforming faith.

I believe in one God, Creator, Intruder, and Agitator Almighty,
maker of heaven and Earth,
creating and imagining still,
      of all things, visible and invisible,
diverse and expanding.
And in my Savior Jesus Christ,
      the Beloved Child of God,
    eternally begotten by God before the planets whirled,
           Divinity from Divinity,
           Love from Love,
           true God from true God,
     begotten, not made;
      of the same essence as God.
      Through Christ all things were made.
For humanity, the universe, and our salvation
Christ broke into the chaos of creation
           becoming incarnate by God’s Spirit and the young, poor Mary,
           and was made flesh.
Christ taught and lived a life of peace and justice,
dined with prostitutes, outcasts, and fools;
denounced religiosity as the way to God’s heart, instead of loving one’s neighbor;
and gave up all power for the sake of loving the world.
           Christ was crucified under Pontius Pilate,
           suffered, and was buried.
 On the third day God raised Christ from the dead, according to the Scriptures,
           he ascended into heaven
           and is extoled to God’s right hand.
         Christ comes again and again
and one day will come in glory
           to judge the living and the dead.
           God’s Realm has already begun and will never end.
I believe in God’s Spirit,
     active and moving, the giver of life and breath.
      God’s Spirit dances with Christ and God in eternity,
      and with God and Christ should be worshiped and glorified.
      God’s Spirit has spoken through the prophets, past and present;
convicts the unjust, heals the wounded, and moves among the unloved.
      I believe God’s Spirit hovers over the one holy catholic and apostolic church.
      I affirm baptism and communion as sacred moments in the Beloved Community.
      I look forward to the resurrection of the dead,
      and to life in the world to come. Amen.

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Chicago Climate March (April 29, 2017)  God’s Spirit moved among us.

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